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Healthcare Experts Share the Latest Thinking & Insights

 

Patient Engagement and Cancer

By | Healthcare Access, Healthcare Costs, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare, Patients | No Comments

The Cancer Moonshot Initiative was announced by former President, Barack Obama on January 12, 2016. He tasked his Vice President, Joseph Biden, with heading the operation, encouraging the collaborations, and funding opportunities this initiative will need to successfully bring about the cure to cancer by the year 2020. Biden, who lost his son to cancer in 2015, has said that this hits too close to home for so many Americans and asks to hear your story.

 

A large part of the over goals of the Cancer Moonshot is to bring about the cure for cancer, but this isn’t the only value it can bring. Great strides have been made in the last year, it’s important to take a step back and evaluate how these leaps and bounds will affect those whose lives are already being negatively impacted by cancer. What has already been done to make the process of diagnostic testing, receiving a diagnosis, and starting/continuing treatment easier?

 

As it stands, the process of navigating through existing red tape between different healthcare facilities can be difficult.

Patient Engagement

In recent years, the importance of patient-driven medicine has come to the forefront of the medical field. It has become more important than ever for cancer patients and their families to stay in communication with their doctors following their diagnosis. With the changing landscape of cancer treatments, involvement from patients and their caregivers is a necessity.

 

For patients of rare cancers, such as mesothelioma, a cancer diagnosis can bring forward a whirlwind of paperwork, phone calls, and appointments with specialists. The need for comprehensive cooperation between organizations can help to make this period of time easier and should be a priority for the coming years.

 

With easier access to medical records of patients, they have a hand in their own care. This can bring a much needed feeling of stability to those whose lives have been uprooted by a diagnosis. Not only will better patient engagement lead to more empowered patients, but patients who have a better understanding of their own healthcare issues and treatment plans.

 

The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance is dedicated to sharing real and relevant information to help those who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, or any other type of cancer, through the difficulties of treatment and caregiving.

 

Dr. Jason Arora, CHI Research Group Member & Director at ICHOM Named to Forbes 30 Under 30 List

By | Healthcare Value, Volume-to-Value | No Comments

LONDON (January 19, 2017) – Jason Arora of the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) and Member of the CHI Research Group, was named in Forbes’ second annual “30 Under 30 Europe” list, a list that features 300 young innovators, entrepreneurs and leaders across Europe who are under 30 years of age and who are transforming business, technology, science, finance, media, culture and more, as judged by some of the most accomplished and acclaimed individuals in each category.  For the full list, please visit: www.forbes.com/30under30europe.

 

Jason Arora is a medical doctor, public health scientist and rising global expert in value-based healthcare, which focuses on delivering the best possible outcomes for patients at the lowest possible cost. Dr. Arora has helped grow ICHOM from a startup to innovative healthcare catalyst, successfully inspiring governments, hospitals and life-science companies to adopt the concept.

 

The Forbes 30 Under 30 Europe list covers 10 categories – Arts, Entertainment, Finance, Industry, Media, Policy, Retail & Ecommerce, Science & Healthcare, Social Entrepreneurs and Technology – with each of the honorees vetted by a panel of expert judges in their respective fields.

 

Randall Lane, Editor of Forbes, said “Researching, vetting and launching Forbes’ second annual 30 Under 30 Europe list was an incredible task.  We scoured the continent to find the most talented millennials and, with the help of our expert judges, are proud to honor 300 of the most important young entrepreneurs, creative leaders and brightest stars in Europe right now.”

The criteria for honorees making the list included leadership and disruption in their field; entrepreneurial mindset and results; and the likelihood of changing their field over the next half-century.

 

The judges have created a unique list of the 300 prodigious stars who are making a difference in our world.  The judges were:

 

  • Arts: Jeremy Till of University of the Arts London, Chef Heinz Beck, and Italian photographer Oliviero Toscani;
  • Entertainment: Forbes editor Mike Ozanian, Afrojack, and British director SJ Clarkson;
  • Finance: Klaus Hommels of Lakestar, Henning Potstada of DWS, and Sonali De Rycker of Accel Ventures;
  • Industry: Phillip Greenish of Royal Academy, Stephane Israel of Arianespace, and former 30 Under 30 Honoree Cornel Amariei of Continental Automotive Systems;
  • Media: Kai Diekmann of Bild, Antonia Rados of RTL Group, and Max Guen of Magna Carta TV;
  • Policy: Josef Janning of European Council on Foreign Relations, Richard Youngs of Carnegie, Endowment Europe, and Brigid Laffan of European University Institute;
  • Retail: Amber Atherton of My Flash Trash and Dharmash Mistry of blow LTD;
  • Science: Barbara Prainsack of King’s College London, Jason Levine of IT and Clinical Informatics at National Cancer Institute, and Iain Woodhouse of University of Edinburgh;
  • Social Entrepreneurs: Forbes Editor Randall Lane, Cheryl Green from Echoing Green, and Jean Case from Case Foundation;
  • Tech: Brent Hoberman of Lastminute.com, former 30 Under 30 Honoree Ophelia Brown at Local Globe, and Tom Hulme of Google Ventures.

 

The complete list, along with video interviews with some of the honorees, is online at www.forbes.com/30under30europe.

 

Forbes’ Under 30 franchise is a global multichannel platform, that comprises 30 Under 30 lists featuring young global game changers published in print and online all over the world; live summits in the U.S., Asia and Israel; an Under 30 channel on Forbes.com; and a Forbes Under 30 app. To access Forbes magazine’s 2017 30 Under 30 U.S. list, please visit www.forbes.com/30under30.

 

 

For these stories and more, visit www.forbes.com

Follow Forbes on Twitter (www.twitter.com/Forbes)

 

 

How Does Patient Engagement Drive Value?

By | Collaboration, Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Value, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare, Patients, Volume-to-Value | No Comments

The 21st-century healthcare landscape is characterized by a consumer-driven, patient-centric model of care delivery, with patients, their caregivers, and advocacy groups playing a vital role in today’s healthcare ecosystem. Patients and their families are taking an active role in their healthcare and proactively interacting with providers and other healthcare stakeholders to improve health and wellness. Today’s patients are better informed and more financially invested than ever before, and they play a key role in decision-making processes that can positively impact health outcomes.

 

This paradigm shift has dramatic implications not only for patients – but also for providers, biopharma, and payers. As healthcare costs pressures continue to increase, incentives are shifting from a fee-for-service environment to a value-based healthcare system. More than ever, it is critical to understand how patient engagement drives value for patients, providers, biopharma, and payers, and ensure your organization is aligned to operate in the new healthcare economy.

 

The How Does Patient Engagement Drive Value? Healthcare Executive Roundtable on Thursday, 10/13/16 in Manhattan, NY, is an expert, cross-sectoral collaborative discussion designed to help healthcare stakeholders optimize engagement, communication, and collaboration. The exclusive, limited-attendance roundtable is designed to provide the top thought-leaders, visionaries, and executives from the patient advocate, provider, biopharma, and payer spaces with the latest insights and ideas on how patient engagement drives healthcare value for all stakeholders. The roundtable focuses on pragmatic and actionable ideas designed to empower you and your organization to understand the intersection of patient engagement and healthcare value. Additionally, the Healthcare Executive Roundtable helps healthcare stakeholders build open and collaborative relationships to positively impact healthcare delivery and outcomes.

 

We have a very limited number of registrations remaining. Please visit chisite.org/education/healthcare-executive-roundtable for more information. We invite you to join us for a day of thought-provoking discussion regarding patient engagement and healthcare value.

The Economist Explores: Why Has Cancer Not Been Cured?

By | Uncategorized | No Comments
In a recent article by The Economist, a simple question was asked: Why has cancer not been cured? Despite a forty year war against the disease, that questions has no simple answer. Research has taught us that more than a mutation of genes, cancer is a disease of specific organs. New therapies are increasingly providing personalized solutions to harness the body’s own immune system in fighting cancer, but more still needs to be understood about the molecular mechanisms that drive it.

On September 28th in Boston at the War on Cancer conference, editors of The Economist will gather more than 200 global health-care players, including Flatiron Health, Memorial Sloan Kettering, IBM, MD Anderson Cancer Center and others to discuss the technological advancements improving our ability to fight cancer and expand access to targeted, quality cancer care.

Some of our notable speakers participating in the event include:

  • Amy Abernethy, Chief medical officer and senior vice-president of oncology, Flatiron Health
  • Christina Åkerman, President, International Consortium For Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM)
  • Peter Bach, Director, center for health policy and outcomes, Memorial Sloan Kettering
  • Amitabh Chandra, Director, health policy research, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
  • Kathleen Kaa, Global head of pricing and market access, Oncology, Roche
  • Kyu Rhee, Chief health officer, IBM

You can save 15% on the current available rate when you register with our special code: CHI15

The Economist’s Healthcare Forum: War on Cancer

By | Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Value, Patients | No Comments

While advances in cancer treatment have come a long way, cancer remains among the leading causes of death worldwide. Though the promise of technology allowing for faster, more precise treatment and more collaborative health care models is inching us closer to victory, scaling the progress made thus far remains a critical next step.

 

On September 28th in Boston, editors of The Economist, experts and thought leaders from across the healthcare ecosystem will gather at the War on Cancer Forum to discuss and debate how innovation can be scaled across policy and financing, prevention, early detection, treatment and long-term management of this deadly disease. Don’t miss the opportunity to network with 200 of your peers and those making major progress in the war on cancer.

 

Some of our notable speakers participating in the event include:

  • Amy Abernethy, Chief medical officer and senior vice-president of oncology, Flatiron Health
  • Christina Åkerman, President, International Consortium For Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM)
  • Peter Bach, Director, Center for health policy and outcomes, Memorial Sloan Kettering
  • Roy Beveridge, Senior vice-president and chief medical officer, Humana
  • Amitabh Chandra, Director, health policy research, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
  • Sally Cowal, Former Ambassador, US Government and senior vice-president of global cancer control, American Cancer Society
  • Jason Efstathiou, Director, Genitourinary division, department of radiation oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Gilles Frydman, Co- founder, Smart Patients
  • Kathy Giusti, Founder, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
  • Kathleen Kaa, Global head of pricing and market access, Oncology, Roche
  • Kelvin Lee, Co-leader, tumor immunology and immunotherapy, Roswell Park Cancer Center
  • Greg Matthews, Managing Director, MDigital Life
  • Josh Ofman, Senior vice-president, global value, access and policy, Amgen
  • Kyu Rhee, Chief health officer, IBM
  • Lowell Schnipper, Chair, value in cancer task force, ASCO

Save 15% on the current available rate when you register with our special code: CHI15

Improving Healthcare Transparency to Build Trust and Engagement

By | Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Access, Healthcare Technology, Informed Patient, Patient-Driven Healthcare | No Comments

Throughout the healthcare industry, there is a growing demand for greater transparency. Today’s healthcare consumer is savvy and well-researched, so the days when a doctor, hospital, or pharmacy could dictate medication recommendations and treatment methods and expect a patient to blindly follow advice are mostly over. Patients also have a variety of options, so supplying valuable information can help a brand to stay competitive.

Medical Billing Transparency

Medical billing transparency is in high demand. Customers expect to know what they will have to pay for a doctor’s appointment, medication at a pharmacy, or treatment ahead of time. Since procedures and medications can vary widely in price, even within the same locale and network, detailing pricing points up front can help a practice to attract and retain customers. By working closely with insurance companies, practices can help customers discern complete out-of-pocket costs ahead of time and plan for those costs.

Health Information Accessibility

Since healthcare practices are required to make meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), these records are more easily shareable now than in the past. Making it possible for patients to view these records online at their convenience can help to drive better healthcare outcomes and can create an atmosphere of trust between healthcare providers and patients. When patients can view their own information and do research about conditions and other health factors, it can also drive engagement.

Online Presence and Familiarity

Having a company website or app can help a patient to feel familiar with a practice office, hospital, or pharmacy before visiting. Showing pictures of the building, waiting office, and possibly medical equipment or rooms can help a patient to feel comfortable when arriving at the location. Supplying a bit of information about doctors and staff can help patients to feel greater trust and reassurance about the quality of care that they will receive.
Setting Patient Expectations In Advance
No patient enjoys arriving to a scheduled appointment on time and then having to wait for hours to see a doctor. Allowing patients to download, print, and fill out patient forms ahead of time can help to expedite appointments and save on office crowding, enhancing the patient experience and making the best use of staff time. Any further information that can be furnished to help patients know what to anticipate, such as standard wait times and average length of time for certain procedures, will further develop patient expectations and improve satisfaction with services.

 

References:
Why Price Transparency Matters Now / Healthcare financial Management Association http://www.hfma.org/content.aspx?id=28785
Meaningful Information for Better Healthcare / The Network for Regional Healthcare Improvement http://www.nrhi.org/work/multi-region-innovation-pilots/center-healthcare-transparency/

Lack of Diversity among Healthcare Providers Impacts Healthcare Disparities

By | Diversity & Inclusion, Health Insurance, Healthcare Access, Healthcare Providers, Patients | No Comments

The U.S. faces great changes in the 21st century.  High levels of immigration from Asia, Central, and South America have dramatically shifted U.S. demographics.  According to the U.S. Census survey, the U.S. may be a majority non-White nation by as early as 2043.  By 2060, the relative percentage of non-Hispanic Whites in the population is expected to decrease to just 43% from 63% in 2010, whereas the relative percentage of Hispanics will nearly double, from 17% in 2010 to a predicted 32% (1).  Despite the rapidly growing minority populations within the U.S., there remain relatively few minority healthcare providers, such as nurses, physicians, and technicians.  For example, as of 2013, 70% of physicians identified as White, while only 6.4% identified as Hispanic and 5.9% as African American (2).

 

The lack of diverse and culturally competent healthcare providers may adversely impact the efficacy and frequency with which this care is administered.  A patient’s language and culture dictate how they express and explain their symptoms, as well as the degree to which they are comfortable seeking medical assistance.  Patients and providers who understand one another’s core principles – especially with regards to medicine – and can communicate effectively have a better chance of achieving a better patient outcome (3).  When asked the question, “do you think that African American and Hispanic patients receive a lower quality of care, the same quality of care, or a better quality of care than White patients?”, A majority of African American patients answered lower, along with around 40% of Hispanic patients (4).  Even 25% of White patients felt that they received a higher quality of care than their minority counterparts (4).  Perhaps even more convincingly, as early as 2005, over 75% of physicians felt that minorities were receiving a lower level of care than White patients, and that figure has been steadily rising (4).  This is an alarming trend.  While these numbers do not necessarily indicate a systemic discrimination within the healthcare industry, it may show a mistrust and lack of communication between minority patients and the mostly White male dominated healthcare industry.

 

This mistrust and miscommunication can manifest itself in other ways, such as insurance coverage.  While Hispanic people make up a mere 17% of the U.S. population, they represent 33% of all uninsured Americans (4).  Lack of insurance coverage, borne of distrust for a largely White-dominated medical system only makes access to adequate care more difficult for minorities.  While the solutions to such endemic issues cannot be solved overnight, the first steps can be taken to rebuild trust between the healthcare industry and minorities, beginning with making provider diversity a priority to bridge the many cultural gaps spanning this great melting pot of a nation.

 

On June 22, 2016, the Center for Healthcare Innovation will be further exploring these issues at the 6th annual Diversity, Inclusion & Life Sciences Symposium, which is the leading annual, collaborative event for life sciences and healthcare executives, physicians, HR professionals, clinical trial professionals and patients, entrepreneurs, patient groups, researchers, academics, and diversity and inclusion advocates to discuss diversity and inclusion in healthcare. Please visit chisite.org/education/diversity-symposium/ for more information.

 

 

References

  1. U.S. Population Projections: 2012-2060 | George Washington University https://www.gwu.edu/~forcpgm/Ortman.pdf
  2. Diversity in the Physician Workforce: Facts and Figures 2014 | AAMC http://aamcdiversityfactsandfigures.org/section-ii-current-status-of-us-physician-workforce/#fig16
  3. Missing Persons: Minorities in the Health Professions | Sullivan Commission on Diversity in the Workforce, pgs. 13-27 http://health-equity.pitt.edu/40/1/Sullivan_Final_Report_000.pdf
  4. Eliminating Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Healthcare: What are the Options? | The Henry J. Kaiser Foundation http://kff.org/disparities-policy/issue-brief/eliminating-racialethnic-disparities-in-health-care-what/

What Changing U.S. Demographics Mean for Clinical Trials

By | Clinical Trials, Diversity & Inclusion, Healthcare Access, Informed Patient, Patients | No Comments

The Food and Drug Administration has declared a renewed focus for 2016 exploring diversity in clinical trials. [1] Data gathered from FDA shows that there is still a significant lack of patient diversity in clinical trials.  “While African-Americans/Blacks represent 12% of the total U.S. population, they comprise just 5% of clinical trial participants. Hispanics account for 16% of the total population but just 1% of trial participants.” [2]

 

As researchers aim to understand how a drug’s effectiveness can vary in different patient groups, it is important to consider how U.S. demographics have begun dramatically shifting. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s latest projection “It is predicted that by 2043, the U.S. will be a majority non-white nation. [3] White Americans will have gone from comprising 85% of the U.S. population in 2012 to just 43%. Hispanic and African Americans/Blacks will have grown substantially over that period, together making up 45 percent of the population with Hispanics being one of the fastest growing groups making up 31%.”[4] Therefore the inclusion of minorities in clinical trials will only become more critical. To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of a new treatment, healthcare industry leaders should ensure the inclusion of a diverse population in clinical trials. Underrepresentation of minorities can skew vital trial and treatment data.

 

Some causes for lack of diversity and inclusion in clinical trials stem from lack of trust in trials, lack of awareness of what trials are, and barriers to participation of minority population in trials. For example, based on the history of medical research in the Tuskegee study, an infamous clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 by the U.S. Public Health Service studying the natural progression of untreated syphilis in rural African-American men in Alabama under the guise of receiving free health care from the United States government, there is a fear of exploitation in medical research.[5] Second, there is often a lack of misunderstanding about the process of clinical trials. Third, there are barriers to participation or feasibility for minority populations to enroll in clinical trial.

 

To attempt solve these complex diversity and inclusion issues, it is critical to go beyond the current one-size fits all approach and raise awareness, build trust, and reach out to under-represented population. Increased diversity in the population pool of clinical trials might just even result in greater confidence in the results and benefits of drugs to the population.

 

The Center for Healthcare Innovation’s Diversity, Inclusion, & Life Sciences Symposium on June 22, 2016 will address these issues in-depth. The Symposium is the leading annual, collaborative event for life sciences and healthcare executives, physicians, HR professionals, clinical trial professionals and patients, entrepreneurs, patient groups, researchers, academics, and diversity and inclusion advocates to discuss diversity and inclusion in healthcare. Please visit chisite.org/education/diversity-symposium/ for more information.

 

 

References

  1. 2016: The Year of Diversity in Clinical Trials | FDA Voice. http://blogs.fda.gov/fdavoice/index.php/2016/01/2016-the-year-of-diversity-in-clinical-trials/.
  2. Bridging the Diversity Gap in Clinical Trials | Thought leadership and innovation for the Pharmaceutical Industry – EyeforPharma. http://social.eyeforpharma.com/clinical/bridging-diversity-gap-clinical-trials.
  3. Census: White majority in U.S. gone by 2043 – U.S. News. http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/06/13/18934111-census-white-majority-in-us-gone-by-2043.
  4. A Study On The Changing Racial Makeup Of “The Next America.” http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/13/changing-racial-makeup-_n_5142462.html.
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuskegee_syphilis_experiment

 

Improving Access for LGBT Clinical Trial Initiatives

By | Clinical Trials, Diversity & Inclusion, Patients | No Comments

In early April of 2016, Washington State lawmakers passed a bill to improve health research for individuals of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender community. Since the state of Washington has a significant LGBT population (more than 173,000 LGBT individuals in Seattle alone), Washington State lawmakers felt it was time to include the LGBT community into patient-centered research initiatives. The legislation requires the National Institutes of Health to coordinate a research strategy that addresses the lack of minority patient populations in current clinical trials in the state of Washington, promoting a more inclusive health-research environment where the needs of the LGBT community are specifically assessed in different clinical trial initiatives.

 

The importance of inclusive legislation in regards to clinical trial participants cannot be understated. A large percentage of clinical trials are failing to meet benchmarks necessary to represent patient populations as a whole. In fact, for clinical trials across the United States, it was determined that less than two percent of trials funded by the National Cancer Institute reached the benchmarks the NIH has set for including minority participants. By excluding minority populations from clinical trials, the health of LGBT members, as well as the health of men and women of color, are put at risk.

 

While Washington State has passed legislation to require inclusive clinical trials for LGBT members, the vast majority of the U.S. has not seen a similar progression. To accurately represent the U.S. patient population, both the federal government and state governments should make it a priority to pass legislation that requires LGBT member participation in clinical trials. Other state governments and the federal government could utilize the bill passed in Washington State as a model to catalyze bipartisan collaboration between the NIH and the minority populations across the nation. Diversity in clinical trials is not just a necessity for the LGBT population, but it is also a necessity for men and women of color and expecting mothers. Legislation is necessary to ensure the validity of clinical trial findings; clinical trials must represent patient populations in their entire diverse nature. The state of Washington has taken a step in the right direction towards promoting more inclusive clinical trials, will the rest of the nation follow suit?

 

The Center for Healthcare Innovation’s Diversity, Inclusion, & Life Sciences Symposium on June 22, 2016 will address these issues in-depth. The Symposium is the leading annual, collaborative event for life sciences and healthcare executives, physicians, HR professionals, clinical trial professionals and patients, entrepreneurs, patient groups, researchers, academics, and diversity and inclusion advocates to discuss diversity and inclusion in healthcare. Please visit chisite.org/education/diversity-symposium/ for more information.

 

 

_________

http://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/blog/health-care-inc/2016/04/washington-state-lawmaker-pushes-bill-to-improve.html

 

The Evolving Role of Healthcare Providers

By | Affordable Healthcare Act, Collaboration, Global Healthcare Trends, Health Insurance, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Providers, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare | No Comments

The Evolving Role of Healthcare Providers

We are in an age of healthcare consumerism where patients’ interests are more vested than ever. It’s important for providers to accommodate the power shift. This means increasing transparency, finding new ways to facilitate communication, responding directly to patient concerns and questions when raised, and being proactive in staying ahead with new innovations in health and medicine.

Patients are also now more informed than ever, which has helped to create a competitive atmosphere in the world of healthcare. Patients can compare services and prices, so healthcare providers must be able to meet expectations and show how they will work with patients to achieve the best outcomes. Healthcare providers can no longer afford to stay on the sidelines and wait for patients to interact; they must actively engage patients regularly.

Attracting New Patients

In the past, healthcare providers could depend on word of mouth and a small ad in the local phone book to bring in patients. A passive approach like this will not work anymore. It is imperative for healthcare providers to carefully create and refine their online presence, not only providing basic information, but also working to appeal to patients. Social media interactions and patient testimonials may help to make an office or provider seem more accessible and attractive.

Working with Health Insurance Agencies

Most patients now have health insurance, thanks in part to the Affordable Care Act. It is wise for healthcare providers to work closely with health insurance agencies to create a seamless experience for patients. Being “in-network” will help patients with particular plans learn about healthcare providers. Being knowledgeable about what services will cost patients out of pocket and taking steps to make the claims process simple for patients may help to distinguish one in-network provider from the rest.

Facilitating Meaningful Engagement

There are now many different options for engaging with patients, so sticking to only contacting patients via telephone sends a message that a provider is behind the times or not willing to make an effort to engage patients. Providers should find out patients’ favored method of communication when gathering basic personal and health information and use those methods to communicate regularly between visits. Patients want evidence that their healthcare providers truly care about their health.

Anticipating Future Changes

The healthcare landscape is becoming ever more connected and comprehensive. Taking action to keep up with current industry trends-such as making information easily accessible by other providers during transitions of care and allowing patients to access information online – will help healthcare providers to stay relevant and in business. Since healthcare is rapidly changing, it is also important to stay one step ahead and anticipate future changes so that it is easy to continue to adapt as shifts occur.


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