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Patient-Driven Healthcare

Patient Engagement and Cancer

By | Healthcare Access, Healthcare Costs, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare, Patients | No Comments

The Cancer Moonshot Initiative was announced by former President, Barack Obama on January 12, 2016. He tasked his Vice President, Joseph Biden, with heading the operation, encouraging the collaborations, and funding opportunities this initiative will need to successfully bring about the cure to cancer by the year 2020. Biden, who lost his son to cancer in 2015, has said that this hits too close to home for so many Americans and asks to hear your story.

 

A large part of the over goals of the Cancer Moonshot is to bring about the cure for cancer, but this isn’t the only value it can bring. Great strides have been made in the last year, it’s important to take a step back and evaluate how these leaps and bounds will affect those whose lives are already being negatively impacted by cancer. What has already been done to make the process of diagnostic testing, receiving a diagnosis, and starting/continuing treatment easier?

 

As it stands, the process of navigating through existing red tape between different healthcare facilities can be difficult.

Patient Engagement

In recent years, the importance of patient-driven medicine has come to the forefront of the medical field. It has become more important than ever for cancer patients and their families to stay in communication with their doctors following their diagnosis. With the changing landscape of cancer treatments, involvement from patients and their caregivers is a necessity.

 

For patients of rare cancers, such as mesothelioma, a cancer diagnosis can bring forward a whirlwind of paperwork, phone calls, and appointments with specialists. The need for comprehensive cooperation between organizations can help to make this period of time easier and should be a priority for the coming years.

 

With easier access to medical records of patients, they have a hand in their own care. This can bring a much needed feeling of stability to those whose lives have been uprooted by a diagnosis. Not only will better patient engagement lead to more empowered patients, but patients who have a better understanding of their own healthcare issues and treatment plans.

 

The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance is dedicated to sharing real and relevant information to help those who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, or any other type of cancer, through the difficulties of treatment and caregiving.

 

How Does Patient Engagement Drive Value?

By | Collaboration, Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Value, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare, Patients, Volume-to-Value | No Comments

The 21st-century healthcare landscape is characterized by a consumer-driven, patient-centric model of care delivery, with patients, their caregivers, and advocacy groups playing a vital role in today’s healthcare ecosystem. Patients and their families are taking an active role in their healthcare and proactively interacting with providers and other healthcare stakeholders to improve health and wellness. Today’s patients are better informed and more financially invested than ever before, and they play a key role in decision-making processes that can positively impact health outcomes.

 

This paradigm shift has dramatic implications not only for patients – but also for providers, biopharma, and payers. As healthcare costs pressures continue to increase, incentives are shifting from a fee-for-service environment to a value-based healthcare system. More than ever, it is critical to understand how patient engagement drives value for patients, providers, biopharma, and payers, and ensure your organization is aligned to operate in the new healthcare economy.

 

The How Does Patient Engagement Drive Value? Healthcare Executive Roundtable on Thursday, 10/13/16 in Manhattan, NY, is an expert, cross-sectoral collaborative discussion designed to help healthcare stakeholders optimize engagement, communication, and collaboration. The exclusive, limited-attendance roundtable is designed to provide the top thought-leaders, visionaries, and executives from the patient advocate, provider, biopharma, and payer spaces with the latest insights and ideas on how patient engagement drives healthcare value for all stakeholders. The roundtable focuses on pragmatic and actionable ideas designed to empower you and your organization to understand the intersection of patient engagement and healthcare value. Additionally, the Healthcare Executive Roundtable helps healthcare stakeholders build open and collaborative relationships to positively impact healthcare delivery and outcomes.

 

We have a very limited number of registrations remaining. Please visit chisite.org/education/healthcare-executive-roundtable for more information. We invite you to join us for a day of thought-provoking discussion regarding patient engagement and healthcare value.

Improving Healthcare Transparency to Build Trust and Engagement

By | Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Access, Healthcare Technology, Informed Patient, Patient-Driven Healthcare | No Comments

Throughout the healthcare industry, there is a growing demand for greater transparency. Today’s healthcare consumer is savvy and well-researched, so the days when a doctor, hospital, or pharmacy could dictate medication recommendations and treatment methods and expect a patient to blindly follow advice are mostly over. Patients also have a variety of options, so supplying valuable information can help a brand to stay competitive.

Medical Billing Transparency

Medical billing transparency is in high demand. Customers expect to know what they will have to pay for a doctor’s appointment, medication at a pharmacy, or treatment ahead of time. Since procedures and medications can vary widely in price, even within the same locale and network, detailing pricing points up front can help a practice to attract and retain customers. By working closely with insurance companies, practices can help customers discern complete out-of-pocket costs ahead of time and plan for those costs.

Health Information Accessibility

Since healthcare practices are required to make meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), these records are more easily shareable now than in the past. Making it possible for patients to view these records online at their convenience can help to drive better healthcare outcomes and can create an atmosphere of trust between healthcare providers and patients. When patients can view their own information and do research about conditions and other health factors, it can also drive engagement.

Online Presence and Familiarity

Having a company website or app can help a patient to feel familiar with a practice office, hospital, or pharmacy before visiting. Showing pictures of the building, waiting office, and possibly medical equipment or rooms can help a patient to feel comfortable when arriving at the location. Supplying a bit of information about doctors and staff can help patients to feel greater trust and reassurance about the quality of care that they will receive.
Setting Patient Expectations In Advance
No patient enjoys arriving to a scheduled appointment on time and then having to wait for hours to see a doctor. Allowing patients to download, print, and fill out patient forms ahead of time can help to expedite appointments and save on office crowding, enhancing the patient experience and making the best use of staff time. Any further information that can be furnished to help patients know what to anticipate, such as standard wait times and average length of time for certain procedures, will further develop patient expectations and improve satisfaction with services.

 

References:
Why Price Transparency Matters Now / Healthcare financial Management Association http://www.hfma.org/content.aspx?id=28785
Meaningful Information for Better Healthcare / The Network for Regional Healthcare Improvement http://www.nrhi.org/work/multi-region-innovation-pilots/center-healthcare-transparency/

The Evolving Role of Healthcare Providers

By | Affordable Healthcare Act, Collaboration, Global Healthcare Trends, Health Insurance, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Providers, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare | No Comments

The Evolving Role of Healthcare Providers

We are in an age of healthcare consumerism where patients’ interests are more vested than ever. It’s important for providers to accommodate the power shift. This means increasing transparency, finding new ways to facilitate communication, responding directly to patient concerns and questions when raised, and being proactive in staying ahead with new innovations in health and medicine.

Patients are also now more informed than ever, which has helped to create a competitive atmosphere in the world of healthcare. Patients can compare services and prices, so healthcare providers must be able to meet expectations and show how they will work with patients to achieve the best outcomes. Healthcare providers can no longer afford to stay on the sidelines and wait for patients to interact; they must actively engage patients regularly.

Attracting New Patients

In the past, healthcare providers could depend on word of mouth and a small ad in the local phone book to bring in patients. A passive approach like this will not work anymore. It is imperative for healthcare providers to carefully create and refine their online presence, not only providing basic information, but also working to appeal to patients. Social media interactions and patient testimonials may help to make an office or provider seem more accessible and attractive.

Working with Health Insurance Agencies

Most patients now have health insurance, thanks in part to the Affordable Care Act. It is wise for healthcare providers to work closely with health insurance agencies to create a seamless experience for patients. Being “in-network” will help patients with particular plans learn about healthcare providers. Being knowledgeable about what services will cost patients out of pocket and taking steps to make the claims process simple for patients may help to distinguish one in-network provider from the rest.

Facilitating Meaningful Engagement

There are now many different options for engaging with patients, so sticking to only contacting patients via telephone sends a message that a provider is behind the times or not willing to make an effort to engage patients. Providers should find out patients’ favored method of communication when gathering basic personal and health information and use those methods to communicate regularly between visits. Patients want evidence that their healthcare providers truly care about their health.

Anticipating Future Changes

The healthcare landscape is becoming ever more connected and comprehensive. Taking action to keep up with current industry trends-such as making information easily accessible by other providers during transitions of care and allowing patients to access information online – will help healthcare providers to stay relevant and in business. Since healthcare is rapidly changing, it is also important to stay one step ahead and anticipate future changes so that it is easy to continue to adapt as shifts occur.

How Can We Boost Patient Engagement?

By | Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Quality, Informed Patient, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare, Patients | No Comments

Young smiling doctor consoling patient sitting on wheel chair outdoor

Many industries today focus on strengthening consumer engagement with their products and services. Whether it’s via social media, websites, mobile apps, video media, or televised commercials, companies across the globe know the importance of marketing their products, services, and technological advances in maintaining profit margins and consumer satisfaction levels. The healthcare industry would be wise to follow similar industry strategies in order to strengthen patient engagement.

There are a numerous views on what exactly defines patient engagement. Broadly speaking, patient engagement is defined as the degree to which patients are involved in their own care. A generally accepted, comprehensive definition provided by HIMSS Analytics states “An organization’s strategy to get patients involved in actively and knowledgeably managing their own health and wellness and that of family members and others for whom they have responsibility. This includes reviewing and managing care records, learning about conditions, adopting healthy behaviors, making informed healthcare purchases, and interacting with care providers as a partner.1 Essentially, patient engagement refers to the tools and technologies healthcare organizations use to engage patients before or after acute episodes of care and during the time between in-person visits.

The time between visits is a particular challenge in patient engagement. During provider-patient visits, discussions with care providers and increased involvement with the patient tends to lead to higher levels of engagement. As months pass after visits, active participation is no longer necessary and engagement becomes less of a priority. The result is often forgotten instructions provided during the visit. The effectiveness of continuous engagement with patients after their treatment was tested with a program that delivered text messages three days a week to 700 gastroenterology patients who were trying to lose weight during a six month period from November 2012 to April 2013. The objective was to analyze the effectiveness of prolonged engagement by comparing the success of the treatment between those who received texts and remained engaged with a control group who was left alone. The results showed that patients who received the text messages dropped 0.5 more on the Body Mass Index (BMI) than patients who did not participate.2 This simple example of increased communication depicts the drastic impact that engagement can have on the patient’s long-term, perceived value of the treatment and instructions given.

The ability to remain in contact with patients through text messaging is an example of how changes in technology offer new opportunities to increase patient engagement. Yet, despite numerous new systems used today, raising patient engagement remains a challenge. In part, this is due to the complexity and scope of effective long-term engagement. According to Dan Housman, Director at Deloitte, the biggest challenges of the historically accepted model of provider and patient relationships stem from assumptions which fail to account for the uniqueness of the individuals involved. These assumptions include that a patient must be obedient and that a physician should act with authority.3 This way of thinking undermines patient-centricity and fails to develop a healthy relationship which promotes patient engagement. By addressing the flaws in the traditional model and revising those to better reflect trending patient-focused values, healthcare providers can more effective communicate the value of continued patient engagement, which ultimately results in its increase.

IBM Watson Health is an example of one of the countless companies in healthcare making efforts to change this model and enhance patient engagement initiatives. This September, they launched a population health program, expanding their online cloud capabilities to provide a more accessible, relevant platform for accessing industry-specific trends and innovations. It is staffed with a team of professionals that engage with users, answering any questions very quickly. This results in more informed patients and addresses the issues with the assumptions in the traditional provider-patient relationship model. Furthermore, the program promotes and records user feedback on treatment which can be used to further improve the methods of care and provide tangible results in healthcare outcomes. Michael Rhodin, Senior Vice President of IBM Watson Group, stated in a press release “This newest expansion of the IBM Watson Health Cloud makes it an even more robust and flexible platform for the life sciences and healthcare industries and explains its rapid adoption among leading organizations in these fields.4 The value added to the interaction helps to promote further patient engagement over time.

Patient engagement is an important aspect the healthcare. It leads to better health outcomes for patients by increasing their understanding of the value in instructions from providers and promotes adhering to suggested preventative measures. Healthcare providers must continuously reach out to patients, keeping them motivated and increasing both parties understanding of the other. CHI will be further exploring patient engagement and its challenges in today’s dynamic healthcare industry at its upcoming Healthcare Executive Roundtable on October 15, 2015 in Manhattan. For more information, please visit http://www.chisite.org/education/healthcare-executive-roundtable.

References

  1. Noteboom, Michelle Ronan. “From Patient Engagement to Telehealth, What Does It All Mean?” Healthcare   IT News. 18 Sept. 2015. Web. 2 Oct. 2015
  2. Fellows, Jacqueline. “Meeting the Challenge of Patient Engagement.” HealthLeaders Media. 26 Aug. 2015. Web. 2 Oct. 2015
  3. Gruessner,Vera. “What Obstacles Stand in the Way of Patient Engagement? ” MHealth Intelligence. 16 Sept. 2015. Web. 2 Oct. 2015
  4. Gruessner, Vera. “Could a Population Health System Improve Patient Engagement?” MHealth Intelligence. 14 Sept. 2015. Web. 2 Oct. 2015.

How Do You Define and Measure Patient Experience?

By | Healthcare Quality, Healthcare Value, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare, Patients | No Comments

Happy senior citizen having a casual small talk with the friendly doctor

In today’s dynamic healthcare industry, with fundamental policy changes and ground-breaking technological advances occurring more than ever, it is vital to reevaluate the metrics used in determining the quality of care given to patients. Determining and measuring healthcare quality is a multi-faceted challenge, which must consider all aspects of care from patient treatment to administration and policy. The patient experience is among the core metrics used today, which is considered the sum of all interactions, shaped by an organization’s culture, that influence patient perceptions across the continuum of care.1 The continuum of care considers every step in the healthcare process from arrival to outcome. As trending healthcare values continuously place a heavier focus around patient-centricity in all aspects of care, accurately measuring the patient experience is increasingly vital. This begins with addressing value discrepancies between provider and patient perspectives, assessing limitations in traditional data gathering methods, and better understanding patient standards of evaluation. A higher level of patient experience has shown yield direct benefits in long-term recovery, compliance with recommended treatment, and many other care outcomes dependent on trust and acceptance from the patient.2

The patient experience is influenced heavily by the culture and policies set by the provider. Whether a county hospital or day clinic, the success of various patient-centric initiatives and, in turn, impact of the overall atmosphere determined by administrators contributes directly into how personnel view and interact with patients. Yet these are a reflection of the staff’s values, which are not necessarily aligned with the values of the patients they treat.3 Therefore, it is imperative to give proper consideration to patients’ perspectives. The healthcare industry’s recent policy changes reflect this ever-growing necessity by offering new reimbursement programs for providers based on metrics that evaluate the patient experience.4 Yet, policy changes at the top can take a long time to trickle down and to patients. By continuously working to understand the difference between the patient’s and provider’s perspective, and its value in relation to patient experience, all healthcare providers can begin to bridge the gap by providing a higher quality level of care that is focused on the patient’s needs.

Understanding the value of the patient’s perspective in the quality of healthcare is limited to the effectiveness of the means used to gather the data. The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey stands as the current standard in gathering data on patient experience. However, the data gathered is greatly dependent upon the level of patient satisfaction; which, while important, does not consider all the elements of the continuum such as quality, safety, and service outcomes.5 This results in a skewed assessment of the current level of patient experience and leads to new initiatives and corrective actions that do not properly address the needs of the patient. To address this disconnect, providers are encouraged to create patient advisory councils that add power to the voice of the patients, adjust CAHPS analysis techniques to account for known limitations, and increase the frequency of leadership rounds that prompt patient interaction.6 These suggestions are based on current efforts that have been implemented based on patient-centricity and represent just a few of the countless possibilities.

Regardless of the accuracy of the data gathered, properly evaluating the level of the patient experience requires understanding what quality of care is to the patient. An extensive research initiative in 2014, led by the Patient Experience Journal, highlighted six key performance indicators patients used when assessing the quality of their care. These were the level of provider participation in care, staff courtesy, self-reported health status, staff follow-up, waiting, and medical explanations.7 Based on these findings, it is apparent that patients place a much higher value on interpersonal interaction than the provider. This is understandable considering the limited knowledge they often possess regarding healthcare services coupled with stress and anxiety that come with health issues. Given an a greater appreciation of these key performance indicators used by patients in evaluating their experience, researchers can better differentiate between patient experience and patient satisfaction while properly aligning efforts to reflect a more accurate picture of patient values.

As the healthcare industry continues to drastically evolve, the challenge of effectively keeping the focus on the patient has grown equally complex. Factors and metrics long since accepted as industry standards have come into question at the same time that industry innovation has created entire new directions to consider. Regardless, the patient experience remains as important as ever. It serves as an essential gauge of quality, that when properly managed, can have profound effects on long-term recovery, patient follow-through, and overall care success. CHI will be further exploring the issues and values associated with the patient experience and many other related topics at our upcoming Healthcare Executive Roundtable on October 15, 2015 in Manhattan. The Roundtable will discuss what patient-centric healthcare value means in the 21st century. This consumer-focused Roundtable Discussion brings the best and brightest healthcare leaders from around the globe together to share their ideas and expertise on the intersection of healthcare value and patient-centricity. Please visit chisite.org/education/healthcare-executive-roundtable for more information.

References

  1. The Beryl Institute. “Defining Patient Experience.” The Beryl Institute. 28 Sept. 2015.
  2. Beattie, Michelle, Douglas J. Murphy, and Iain Atherton. “Instruments to Measure Patient Experience of Healthcare Quality in Hospitals: A Systematic Review.” National Center for Biotechnology. US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, 23 July 2015. Web. 28 Sept. 2015.
  3. Brown, Claire R. “Where are the Patients in the Quality of Health Care?” International Journal for Quality in Health Care3 (2007): 125-26. Oxford University Press. Web. 28 Sept. 2015.
  4. “Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers & Systems (CAHPS).” Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 8 June 2015. Web. 28 Sept. 2015.
  5. Wolf, Jason A. “Patient Experience, Satisfaction Not One and the Same.” Hospital Impact. 24 July 2014. Web. 28 Sept. 2015.
  6. Merlino, James I., and Ananth Raman. “Understanding the Drivers of the Patient Experience.” Harvard Business Review. 17 Sept. 2013. Web. 28 Sept. 2015.
  7. Van De Ven, Andrew H. “What Matters Most to Patients? Participative Provider Care and Staff Courtesy.” Patient Experience Journal1 (2014): 131-39. Print.

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