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Global Healthcare Trends

What Healthcare Diversity Looks Like in The 21st century

By | Clinical Trials, Diversity & Inclusion, Global Healthcare Trends, Patients | No Comments

Diversity is a key word in the healthcare system. It can be defined as the blending of different backgrounds, with representation across gender, race/ethnicity, generation, and sexual orientation. Diversity is undeniably one of the most important topics in today’s society. In fact, according to an article published in Becker’s Hospital Review, millennials are the most diverse generation in the U.S. Population [1]. This change has brought the demand for a better quality of life across every social aspect, such as healthcare[2].

Despite the focus on relatively high economic factors in our healthcare system, many issues on the social spectrum remain unaddressed. One of the issues that our healthcare system faces today is the lack of representation for our ever-growing, diverse, population. As stated in an article published in Modern Healthcare, the lack of true diversity among leaders in this industry has stayed consistent[3]. How consistent? Well, according to Kevin E. Lofton, CEO of Englewood, Colorado-based Catholic Health Initiatives, this has been an issue since he started his career back in 1978. The healthcare industry has done a poor job of adjusting to the rapid demographic changes in recent years.

According to a survey conducted in 2013 by the American Hospital Association’s Institute for Diversity, minority representation on healthcare boards across the nation stood at 14 percent [4]. Furthermore, the same survey reported that minorities represented 31 percent of patients nationally. This is an issue that needs to change in the next couple of years. In an article published by David Ferguson, he mentions that a lack of diverse leadership in the healthcare industry can present a cultural gulf that must be overcome if the industry plans on switching to patient-centered care[5]. Emphasizing the crucial importance of diversity is critical if we ever hope to have an adequate health care system that is inclusive and represents the diverse set of people living in this nation.

Change must start at the top of the executive pyramid. Why? Well, those at the top are the ones with the power to make decisions.  In addition, increasing the number of physicians of color can foster higher levels of patient satisfaction among underrepresented groups in the community[6]. Most importantly, it is key to let minority groups know that the resources are there for them to take initiative. This can only work if both healthcare providers and patients work together to bring much-needed change to a system as sophisticated as the healthcare industry.

We must look at different initiatives that in the long-term can foster a system where the gap between healthcare inequality is minimal or non-existent. These initiatives must produce a system that is not only inclusive but effective as well. Shedding light on this issue is a must among healthcare leaders since they become the voice of the underrepresented populations. In the end, it is important to push for change and create something meaningful in an industry where change is long overdue.

To further explore these diversity trends, CHI is organizing our 7th annual Diversity, Inclusion, & Life Sciences Symposium on 6/15/17 in Chicago. The Symposium is the leading annual, collaborative event for life sciences and healthcare executives, physicians, HR professionals, clinical trial professionals and patients, entrepreneurs, patient groups, researchers, academics, and diversity and inclusion advocates to discuss diversity and inclusion in healthcare. The symposium focuses on the latest trends, challenges, opportunities, and best practices for implementing strategies and tactics to make these industries more diverse and inclusive, as well as understand how to better serve diverse patient groups. Attendees will learn the newest insights and ideas, discuss practical solutions, and meet new industry and marketplace colleagues. See a video at http://www.snip.ly/fxln8. This year’s symposium will include topics such as the role of coaching and mentoring in executive success, diversity and inclusion in clinical trials and research, and expanding definitions of diversity. Please visit http://chisite.org/dilss/ for more info or to register. Register before 5/13 to receive early registration discount.

 

References

[1] Jayanthi A. The new look of diversity in healthcare: Where we are and where we’re headed. Becker’s Hospital Review. http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-management-administration/the-new-look-of-diversity-in-healthcare-where-we-are-and-where-we-re-headed.html. Accessed January 25, 2017.

 

[2] Dorning J. The U.S. Health Care System: An International Perspective. Department For Professional Employees. http://dpeaflcio.org/programs-publications/issue-fact-sheets/the-u-s-health-care-system-an-international-perspective/#_edn24. Accessed January 25, 2017.

 

[3] Lofton K. Need for more diversity in healthcare leadership represents a moral and business imperative. Modern Healthcare. http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20161119/MAGAZINE/311199945. Accessed January 25, 2017.

 

[4] Diversity and Disparities. Diversity Connection. http://www.diversityconnection.org/diversityconnection/leadership-conferences/diversity_disparities_Benchmark_study_hospitals_2013.pdf. Accessed January 25, 2017.

 

[5] Ferguson D. Diversity in healthcare leadership drives better patient outcomes and community connection. Fierce Healthcare. http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/diversity-healthcare-leadership-drives-better-patient-outcomes-and-community-connection. Accessed January 25, 2017.

 

[6] King M. The importance of cultural diversity in healthcare | Brainwaves. The University of Vermont. https://learn.uvm.edu/blog-health/cultural-diversity-in-healthcare. Accessed January 25, 2017.

 

How Does Patient Engagement Drive Value?

By | Collaboration, Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Value, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare, Patients, Volume-to-Value | No Comments

The 21st-century healthcare landscape is characterized by a consumer-driven, patient-centric model of care delivery, with patients, their caregivers, and advocacy groups playing a vital role in today’s healthcare ecosystem. Patients and their families are taking an active role in their healthcare and proactively interacting with providers and other healthcare stakeholders to improve health and wellness. Today’s patients are better informed and more financially invested than ever before, and they play a key role in decision-making processes that can positively impact health outcomes.

 

This paradigm shift has dramatic implications not only for patients – but also for providers, biopharma, and payers. As healthcare costs pressures continue to increase, incentives are shifting from a fee-for-service environment to a value-based healthcare system. More than ever, it is critical to understand how patient engagement drives value for patients, providers, biopharma, and payers, and ensure your organization is aligned to operate in the new healthcare economy.

 

The How Does Patient Engagement Drive Value? Healthcare Executive Roundtable on Thursday, 10/13/16 in Manhattan, NY, is an expert, cross-sectoral collaborative discussion designed to help healthcare stakeholders optimize engagement, communication, and collaboration. The exclusive, limited-attendance roundtable is designed to provide the top thought-leaders, visionaries, and executives from the patient advocate, provider, biopharma, and payer spaces with the latest insights and ideas on how patient engagement drives healthcare value for all stakeholders. The roundtable focuses on pragmatic and actionable ideas designed to empower you and your organization to understand the intersection of patient engagement and healthcare value. Additionally, the Healthcare Executive Roundtable helps healthcare stakeholders build open and collaborative relationships to positively impact healthcare delivery and outcomes.

 

We have a very limited number of registrations remaining. Please visit chisite.org/education/healthcare-executive-roundtable for more information. We invite you to join us for a day of thought-provoking discussion regarding patient engagement and healthcare value.

The Economist’s Healthcare Forum: War on Cancer

By | Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Value, Patients | No Comments

While advances in cancer treatment have come a long way, cancer remains among the leading causes of death worldwide. Though the promise of technology allowing for faster, more precise treatment and more collaborative health care models is inching us closer to victory, scaling the progress made thus far remains a critical next step.

 

On September 28th in Boston, editors of The Economist, experts and thought leaders from across the healthcare ecosystem will gather at the War on Cancer Forum to discuss and debate how innovation can be scaled across policy and financing, prevention, early detection, treatment and long-term management of this deadly disease. Don’t miss the opportunity to network with 200 of your peers and those making major progress in the war on cancer.

 

Some of our notable speakers participating in the event include:

  • Amy Abernethy, Chief medical officer and senior vice-president of oncology, Flatiron Health
  • Christina Åkerman, President, International Consortium For Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM)
  • Peter Bach, Director, Center for health policy and outcomes, Memorial Sloan Kettering
  • Roy Beveridge, Senior vice-president and chief medical officer, Humana
  • Amitabh Chandra, Director, health policy research, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
  • Sally Cowal, Former Ambassador, US Government and senior vice-president of global cancer control, American Cancer Society
  • Jason Efstathiou, Director, Genitourinary division, department of radiation oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Gilles Frydman, Co- founder, Smart Patients
  • Kathy Giusti, Founder, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
  • Kathleen Kaa, Global head of pricing and market access, Oncology, Roche
  • Kelvin Lee, Co-leader, tumor immunology and immunotherapy, Roswell Park Cancer Center
  • Greg Matthews, Managing Director, MDigital Life
  • Josh Ofman, Senior vice-president, global value, access and policy, Amgen
  • Kyu Rhee, Chief health officer, IBM
  • Lowell Schnipper, Chair, value in cancer task force, ASCO

Save 15% on the current available rate when you register with our special code: CHI15

Improving Healthcare Transparency to Build Trust and Engagement

By | Global Healthcare Trends, Healthcare Access, Healthcare Technology, Informed Patient, Patient-Driven Healthcare | No Comments

Throughout the healthcare industry, there is a growing demand for greater transparency. Today’s healthcare consumer is savvy and well-researched, so the days when a doctor, hospital, or pharmacy could dictate medication recommendations and treatment methods and expect a patient to blindly follow advice are mostly over. Patients also have a variety of options, so supplying valuable information can help a brand to stay competitive.

Medical Billing Transparency

Medical billing transparency is in high demand. Customers expect to know what they will have to pay for a doctor’s appointment, medication at a pharmacy, or treatment ahead of time. Since procedures and medications can vary widely in price, even within the same locale and network, detailing pricing points up front can help a practice to attract and retain customers. By working closely with insurance companies, practices can help customers discern complete out-of-pocket costs ahead of time and plan for those costs.

Health Information Accessibility

Since healthcare practices are required to make meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs), these records are more easily shareable now than in the past. Making it possible for patients to view these records online at their convenience can help to drive better healthcare outcomes and can create an atmosphere of trust between healthcare providers and patients. When patients can view their own information and do research about conditions and other health factors, it can also drive engagement.

Online Presence and Familiarity

Having a company website or app can help a patient to feel familiar with a practice office, hospital, or pharmacy before visiting. Showing pictures of the building, waiting office, and possibly medical equipment or rooms can help a patient to feel comfortable when arriving at the location. Supplying a bit of information about doctors and staff can help patients to feel greater trust and reassurance about the quality of care that they will receive.
Setting Patient Expectations In Advance
No patient enjoys arriving to a scheduled appointment on time and then having to wait for hours to see a doctor. Allowing patients to download, print, and fill out patient forms ahead of time can help to expedite appointments and save on office crowding, enhancing the patient experience and making the best use of staff time. Any further information that can be furnished to help patients know what to anticipate, such as standard wait times and average length of time for certain procedures, will further develop patient expectations and improve satisfaction with services.

 

References:
Why Price Transparency Matters Now / Healthcare financial Management Association http://www.hfma.org/content.aspx?id=28785
Meaningful Information for Better Healthcare / The Network for Regional Healthcare Improvement http://www.nrhi.org/work/multi-region-innovation-pilots/center-healthcare-transparency/

The Evolving Role of Healthcare Providers

By | Affordable Healthcare Act, Collaboration, Global Healthcare Trends, Health Insurance, Healthcare Innovation, Healthcare Providers, Patient Engagement, Patient-Driven Healthcare | No Comments

The Evolving Role of Healthcare Providers

We are in an age of healthcare consumerism where patients’ interests are more vested than ever. It’s important for providers to accommodate the power shift. This means increasing transparency, finding new ways to facilitate communication, responding directly to patient concerns and questions when raised, and being proactive in staying ahead with new innovations in health and medicine.

Patients are also now more informed than ever, which has helped to create a competitive atmosphere in the world of healthcare. Patients can compare services and prices, so healthcare providers must be able to meet expectations and show how they will work with patients to achieve the best outcomes. Healthcare providers can no longer afford to stay on the sidelines and wait for patients to interact; they must actively engage patients regularly.

Attracting New Patients

In the past, healthcare providers could depend on word of mouth and a small ad in the local phone book to bring in patients. A passive approach like this will not work anymore. It is imperative for healthcare providers to carefully create and refine their online presence, not only providing basic information, but also working to appeal to patients. Social media interactions and patient testimonials may help to make an office or provider seem more accessible and attractive.

Working with Health Insurance Agencies

Most patients now have health insurance, thanks in part to the Affordable Care Act. It is wise for healthcare providers to work closely with health insurance agencies to create a seamless experience for patients. Being “in-network” will help patients with particular plans learn about healthcare providers. Being knowledgeable about what services will cost patients out of pocket and taking steps to make the claims process simple for patients may help to distinguish one in-network provider from the rest.

Facilitating Meaningful Engagement

There are now many different options for engaging with patients, so sticking to only contacting patients via telephone sends a message that a provider is behind the times or not willing to make an effort to engage patients. Providers should find out patients’ favored method of communication when gathering basic personal and health information and use those methods to communicate regularly between visits. Patients want evidence that their healthcare providers truly care about their health.

Anticipating Future Changes

The healthcare landscape is becoming ever more connected and comprehensive. Taking action to keep up with current industry trends-such as making information easily accessible by other providers during transitions of care and allowing patients to access information online – will help healthcare providers to stay relevant and in business. Since healthcare is rapidly changing, it is also important to stay one step ahead and anticipate future changes so that it is easy to continue to adapt as shifts occur.


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